Make Me Think Monday

30 03, 2020

Finding Happiness in a Dark Time

By |2020-03-29T19:11:53-05:00March 30th, 2020|Make Me Think Monday|0 Comments

Today is Happiness Day. It’s a bit of a strange topic when we have a pandemic going on and death tolls rising. Still, we can all use a little happiness with all this craziness bombarding us.

Where can we find happiness?

First, and foremost, turn off the news. Quit watching every single newscast all day long. Stay informed but take a break.

I think we’ve all gotten the message. This is not getting better. If you listen to the experts, it’s going to be worse.

Truth is we do not know. So why, listen to all the speculation that only fuels a pervasive dread of what’s coming next.

And, because you’re stuck inside try some of these ideas to find a little happy…

  • Now that you’re living twenty-four/seven with all your stuff, bet you’re finding there’s hardly room for you. Clean out that sock drawer. Get rid of what you don’t need, haven’t used. You’ll feel lighter for it. Happier.
  • Escape to another world via reading. Try a new genre or a new author. Do a search for your favorite author.
  • Our local library offers free downloads of eBooks, magazines and newspapers. Check your library to see if they offer the same service.
  • Call people you haven’t talked to in years, just to say, “Hey. You okay? I want you to be okay.” It’s a good thing to do. Something we should be doing even if there wasn’t a pandemic lurking outside.

Find happy in diversions…

  • Go online, not to check the latest news, but to learn things we’ve always meant to learn, like Spanish or Gaelic, yoga or basket weaving, and how to play the ukulele.
  • Walk through prestigious cultural institutions, like The Met and The American Museum of Natural History or visit any one of the zoos offering tours. Need a list of virtual tours? Check here.
  • Work a jigsaw puzzle
  • Do a free crossword puzzle

Consider the good that’s happening.

  • Neighbors are stepping up to help one another. Desperate times are bringing out the good in people and renewing the belief we once held that good people help each other.
  • Our hopelessly divided government is worked out bipartisan legislation to help.
  • Pollution is easing with less cars on the road.

Yes, people are dying, but people are also recovering from COVID-19. Civilization is not going to end. Life will change as the emergency eases, normal will be different, and likely better.

Focus on the good stuff, and do something frivolous or fun.

Like a virtual ride on Disney’s new Frozen II roller coaster.

Be safe. Stay healthy. Find something that makes you happy.

23 03, 2020

Coronavirus – Crisis, Chaos, and Change

By |2020-03-22T17:31:37-05:00March 23rd, 2020|Make Me Think Monday, Writer's Life|1 Comment

Crisis, chaos, and change are the three components of every major event.

Remember the existential edginess of 9/11? It’s returned.

During that crisis, we hunkered down at home with loved ones close, glued to our televisions, as the world around us changed. Our hearts trembled in fear that day. We survived.

Crisis, along with its bedfellows of chaos and change, happened again during the Colorado wildfires of 2013.

Maybe not everyone, but edginess and uncertainty ruled with mandatory evacuations for us. We piled two cars with our most precious belongings, two dogs, and ourselves. Our home was spared, but our world changed. We survived.

Crisis struck again in 2017 when Harvey dumped torrential waters and once again uncertainty, losses, and dramatic life-changes swirled around us.

Now a pandemic called COVID-19, coronavirus swirls worldwide crisis and chaos.

There’s nothing good about this crisis. Fears are rampant.

No one escapes the chaos of bare grocery store shelves or quarantines, voluntary and mandated. NO toilet paper, really?

As we grope our way along through the chaos, here are six suggestions (paraphrased by me) from Writer Unboxed blog contributor Sarah McCoy.

  • Buy Flowers. Splurge on a bouquet at the store or pick some wildflowers or plant some seeds.
  • Get Outdoors. Self-isolation doesn’t mean we are locked in jail. Isolate yourself with a walk in nature. Drive to a nature trail, if necessary, where there are crowds.
  • A Song. Listen or sing your own. Songs are the medicine of angels, and it will resonate in you for hours… days… however long this quarantine takes.
  • Cook. To create a nutritious, virus-free dish for yourself and your loved ones is a simple recipe for joy.
  • Write A letter. To another person or yourself in a journal. According to the World Health Organization, the coronavirus can only live on paper for 24 hours. Letters sent through USPS take 2-3 days. It’s safe.
  • Read. For a writer like me, that’s a given. It’s my way to escape even when there’s no chaos.

Choose one or all of Ms. McCoy’s suggestions. Doing so requires nothing and will offer great relief from “the toxic fear plaguing us as tenaciously as this microbial foe.”

Take heart in knowing we got through 9/11, wildfires, and floods and so many other crises. We can rest in the assurance this darkness will give way to the light too.

Be safe, dear ones.

16 03, 2020

Which is it – Supper or Dinner?

By |2020-03-15T17:09:40-05:00March 16th, 2020|Make Me Think Monday|0 Comments

In the grand scheme of things this is not even a blimp on the radar, only I recently had the word supper changed to dinner by a copy editor. Even with everything else going on in the world, that troubled me.

The editor said dinner is used more often. I responded in the South we eat supper and go to dinner.

That didn’t help.

Not to be defeated, I did my favorite thing—research—and discovered dinner doesn’t refer to a specific time of day but refers to the main meal. The word supper comes from the Old French word “souper,” meaning “evening meal.”

In her NPR interview, food historian Helen Zoe Veit says, “[In the 18th and early 19th centuries,] Americans regularly ate a light supper as their evening meal because they were eating dinner—the biggest meal of the day—around noon.”

(Who knew there was such a thing as a food historian?)

Anyway, Veit further explains the reason for eating the biggest meal at noontime was so farmers would have more strength and energy to get through the rest of their workday. When Americans began working away from their homes and farms and couldn’t easily return home to cook and eat in the middle of the day, large noon meals disappeared too. Having the main meal of the day in the evening meant they could spend more time enjoying their food and spending time with their family.

The word supper is more commonly used in Southern and Midwestern states. Mostly likely because those regions are agricultural.

Nowadays I think most folks eat meals at all hours, not necessarily by the clock or large meals. You can have brunch between breakfast and lunch and lupper between lunch and bedtime.

Heads up here… you’re not going to find that word lupper in the dictionary. It’s a word I made up to explain to my children why lunch was skipped and there’d be no supper.

In my research I ran across this fascinating blog on the supper vs dinner question. Lovely vintage photos. Take a peek, you’ll enjoy it.

P.S. The word supper stayed. After all, the story takes place in rural Texas. That is supper eating country.

9 03, 2020

Disruption and A Black Swan Named Coronavirus

By |2020-03-09T09:59:31-05:00March 9th, 2020|Make Me Think Monday|0 Comments

I’ve lived long enough to know that life is never smooth. And, I know what’s happening around me can disrupt my writing brain. I’ve accepted that and adjust accordingly.

I can settle into a writing routine sans television and social media and pump out the words on my next work in progress.

Then whammy. World events erupt tossing an unexpected curve ball. The stock market sank 1,000 points.

Now, I don’t follow the stock market. But I do know enough to recognize a huge dip like that means there’s trouble in River City.

On goes the news again. I discover the cause. And this disruption is a Wowizer— coronavirus COVID-19 is threatening a pandemic. Fear over the impact on the economy is rampant.

Scary stuff.

All the journalistic sensationalism is troublesome. I’m not being blasé. I do realize the inherent danger and have amped up basic hygiene routines per CDC instructions.

But I’ve watched in utter amazement as media coverage has created its own pandemic.  Shelves in stores are bare as people hoard assorted items named as potential to be hard to get. Prices of these necessary items are being raised to ridiculous amounts. (And, people paying those prices!)

That’s sick.

I had a moment of reality when news came that the virus had spread to communities near me. I’m not carelessly believing I’ll be fine. I’m taking precautions.

But I’m not panicked.

We have food and supplies stockpiled (comes from years of living where grocery stores were a long way away and being snowbound happened too often). We’ll share toilet paper and Kleenex.

Whatever happens will happen. Nothing I can do stop to it or avoid it.

In her blog Kristine Kathryn Rusch that called the situation a Black Swan event being fed by overenthusiastic journalists.

I didn’t know the term Black Swan. Business Major Hubby explained it was a term for an unpredictable event that causes catastrophic damage to the stock market.

Well, this disruption certainly qualifies.

Surely the mad dash to secure hand sanitizers, disinfectant, and toilet paper is straining supplies, depleting stock, and ultimately effecting a company’s bottom line. What manufacturer could have known the virus COVID-19 would increase  demand and drain their supplies?

Never mind, too many of these products come from China where the virus has pretty much shut things down. The way COVID-19 is spreading worldwide the whole supply chain is being affected.

The term Black Swan itself originated from an ancient saying that presumed black swans did not exist then had to be reinterpreted to teach a different lesson after black swans were discovered in the wild.

(Probably much more than you wanted to know about the term, but what can I say, I’m a writer. I love research.)

The scariest thing about this Coronavirus Black Swan is the isolation that’s being created. We’re instructed to avoid physical contact-no handshakes or hugs, large crowds, and travel, particularly any foreign travel. Major events are being canceled. Cruises and conferences are canceled. Even the Olympics is danger of cancellation.

Disruptions that go way beyond my writing time!

This blog is not to tell you how to prepare or explain why companies should have known to have larger stock of certain items. It’s a gentle warning…

Sometimes, in our hyper-vigilance, we focus too much on news and social media. Neither of which are not the most reliable sources for accurate information.

I urge you to get your information about the situation from solid sources like the World Health Organization and/or the Center for Disease Control and Prevention

Please be safe out there and take care of yourself.

Me, I’m turning off the television and focusing on getting this work in progress finished.

17 02, 2020

Love Stories of Lincoln and Washington

By |2020-02-09T12:17:43-06:00February 17th, 2020|Holidays, Make Me Think Monday|1 Comment

Some of us will remember when February had holidays for only two presidents—George Washington on February 22 and Abraham Lincoln on February 16.Their actual birthdays.

These days we pay tribute to all presidents on one day in February.

To honor the two presidents with birthdays this month I’m sharing the stories of their marriages.

Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd Lincoln

My wife was as handsome as when she was a girl,” Lincoln once told a reporter. “And I, poor nobody then, fell in love with her, and what is more, have never fallen out.

Mary Todd, the daughter of a successful merchant and politician, attracted the attention of up-and-coming politician and lawyer Abraham Lincoln. They shared a love of politics and literature and a deep love for each other. Unfortunately, her family did not approve of the match.

When he won his Congressional seat in 1846, she followed him to Washington. Something unheard of at the time.

 

George Washington and Martha Dandridge Custis Washington

The romance of George and Martha was not a passionate romance by today’s standards. In the eighteenth century marriages were made to ease circumstances and build a good life.

She was the wealthiest widow in Virginia, with a 17,500 acre estate to manage and two very young children when they first met. He was a general who had just retired and needed a job. At the time of their engagement, they merely liked each other a great deal.

Eight months into his marriage, George wrote, “I am now I beleive fixd at this Seat with an agreable Consort for Life and hope to find more happiness in retirement than I ever experienced amidst a wide and busthng World.”

George and Martha chose their partners wisely, perhaps more than they realized at the time. According to historians, the couple shared forty years together during which they grew to love each other with true devotion.

I do love good love stories.

10 02, 2020

Gestures of Love

By |2020-02-01T12:19:51-06:00February 10th, 2020|Make Me Think Monday|2 Comments

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. Time to think about how to show our Valentine love.

French writer François Rabelais offers this suggestion. “Gestures, in love, are incomparably more attractive, effective, and valuable than words.”

How about these impressive gestures of love?

  • Shah Jahan, the Mughal emperor built the Taj Mahal as a tomb for his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died giving birth to the couple’s 14th child.

 

  • Edward VIII abdicated the throne for American Wallis Simpson. They married in 1937 and spent the rest of their lives in retirement in France. Makes me wonder if Prince Henry’s recent decision to leave the royal family was a gesture of love for his American wife.
  • Elizabeth Barrett Browning composed love poems for Robert Browning during their courtship. “Sonnets from the Portuguese” was published in 1850. That’s where we get the immortal line, “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.”

 

  • Joe DiMaggio was married to Marilyn Monroe for only 274 days in 1954. He spent the rest of his life sending red roses to her grave in Los Angeles three times a week.

My love hasn’t built me a Taj Mahal, but he willingly completes honey-do lists.

He hasn’t abdicated a throne, but he promises me he would if he had one to abdicate.

His love notes aren’t published, but the words surpass Ms. Browning’s sonnets.

I won’t be around to see if he leaves flowers on my grave, but he surprises me often with a lovely bouquet.

I considers all his gestures comparable to those of the people above.

How will you share Valentine love? Are you willing to share some awesome romantic gesture you’re planning or have received?

3 02, 2020

Smiling Eggs

By |2020-01-26T13:52:35-06:00February 3rd, 2020|Make Me Think Monday, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Monday, Again. Time to get to work.

Though writers don’t punch a time clock, Mondays are Mondays, the official notification the weekend is ended. Time to start weekday commitments.

After loose weekend schedules or overly busy weekends, writers have the same reactions as other workers. Ugh!

This particular Monday, I decided to fix a hearty breakfast to fortify me for the busy week ahead.

I pulled out the eggs Chicken Wrangler Sara brought over the weekend. Smiley face eggs on the recycled egg carton grinned at me.

Then I opened the carton and had a special note from Emma the hen who supplied my breakfast.

And a heart that made me smile. I whispered a thank you to Emma. It was a great start for a good week.

Bring it on, Monday. I’m ready.

27 01, 2020

Leftover Christmas

By |2020-01-26T10:35:53-06:00January 27th, 2020|Holidays, Make Me Think Monday|0 Comments

Christmas is long gone. January 2020 is fading fast, finally. Why is it January seems ten times longer than the rest of the months? But I digress.

A former schoolteacher, I love decorating for holidays. I guess it’s a holdover from all those bulletin boards I had to do. I have boxes for Valentine’s, St. Patrick Day, Texas Independence Day, 4th of July, and, since I live in Texas again, boxes of Fall décor. Then comes Thanksgiving and Christmas decorations and there are several boxes of those.

Anyway, I’m getting out my February decorations box for Valentine’s Day and what do I find? Leftover Christmas.

I’m surprised guests who’ve been to the house didn’t notice.

Maybe not the counted cross stitch Merry Christmas heart, but the guest hand towels were pretty obviously leftovers. I  guess they pretended not to notice.

I appreciate the kindness.

The leftover discovery was really disconcerting. I believed I had all Christmas tucked away by Epiphany. That’s January 6, my yearly goal though it doesn’t always happen. Oblivious.

This year I honestly thought I’d aced the put away Christmas. Then this discovery.

I’d feel badly except I still see Christmas clearance items in stores next to Valentine’s Day merchandise. Unlike those retail stores who will hang onto leftover Christmas until it’s reduced to practically free, I’ve stuffed my two little leftovers in their boxes to come out again next Christmas.

20 01, 2020

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day = National Day of Service

By |2020-01-17T13:14:17-06:00January 20th, 2020|Holidays, Make Me Think Monday|1 Comment

Martin Luther King, Jr. believed life’s most persistent and urgent question was:

‘What are you doing for others?’

Today marks the 25th anniversary of the federally established day of service that celebrates the Civil Rights leader’s life and legacy.

On the National Day of Service everyone is encouraged to volunteer to improve our communities. Something, in my opinion, we should consider more than one day a year.

If you can only manage one day, then make it this one.

And, whatever you choose to do today, think about this excerpt from one of my favorite King quotes:

“… anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve.
You don’t have to make your subject and verb agree to serve.
You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.”

Looking for ideas on how you can serve? Find opportunities available in your  community here you’ll need to enter your zip code.

13 01, 2020

What Day Is It?

By |2020-01-13T16:08:03-06:00January 13th, 2020|Make Me Think Monday|0 Comments

Besides Monday, I mean.

According to National Day Calendar, it’s National Rubber Ducky Day.

The friend of Ernie and Big Bird made his debut on Sesame Street in the 1970s. Ernie sat in a tub and sang the rubber duck song.

My kids loved playing with their rubber duckies in the bathtub and singing Ernie’s song. Our dogs destroyed at least a thousand rubber duck squeakers over the years.

Then were all the rubber duck races. We’ve purchased floating yellow ducks for fundraiser events then watched the duckies float down the Rio Grande River.

Our ducks never won the race, but I didn’t mind what we spent went to a charity.

So, what’s the best way to celebrate this auspicious day? Take a bath with a yellow rubber duck while singing the Rubber Duck song, of course.

Now that you know, how will you celebrate National Rubber Duck Day?

So many ducks... Ducking hell

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