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7 08, 2023

To Speed Read Or Not To Speed Read

By |2023-08-06T15:29:47-05:00August 7th, 2023|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Speed reading is defined as the process of recognizing and absorbing phrases or sentences on a page all at once, rather than focusing on individual words.

Research points to three advantages of speed reading.

  • Increased comprehension
  • Less eye time on the page
  • Less eye fatigue

It’s a handy skill in today’s world where we spend so much time reading—emails, web articles, texts, etc. We likely feel pressure to get through all this information more quickly, so that we “stay in the loop” and make informed decisions. Speed reading allows us to do that.

Photo by Tima Miroshnichenko Pexels.com

Photo by seyfi durmaz, Pexels.com

Reading to gain information or facts is one type of reading. I use rapid reading to wade through writing craft articles, blogs, and book research.

I don’t use speed reading if I’m reading for pleasure.

Then I want to savor the story and the author’s style of writing. I read every word.

My go-to technique in speed reading is skimming and skipping smaller words, i.e., prepositions and articles.

The technique creates a problem when I’m writing, though. I tend to leave out those words there too. Fortunately, critique partners, beta readers, and editors put them all back in.

Average adult readers read at a speed of 238 words per minute. Learning to speed read can raise that rate.

President John F. Kennedy was a big believer in speed reading. He read 1200 per minute. President Jimmy Carter’s reading speed is reported at 2,000 words per minute. Evelyn Wood read 2,500 words per minute. Check out other famous speed readers speeds here.

Speed reading is not for everyone, but it is a skill you can acquire. Want to learn more and whether it’s for you? Check out these articles.

http://www.mindtools.com/speedrd.html

http://english.glendale.cc.ca.us/methods.html

Or give speed reading a try with this eight-minute free YouTube video that teaches speed reading techniques.

4 08, 2023

Complete Pack

By |2023-08-03T09:29:10-05:00August 4th, 2023|Uncategorized|0 Comments

A Blog by Chicken Wrangler Sara


We picked up our new puppy last week. The timing was perfect because we said goodbye to Coco in July. She was the last of our original pack of four.

The puppy is one of three that were born near Memorial Day. The foster mom named them Honor, Legacy, and Valor and they are the Tribute Puppies. Honor is ours and she is wonderful.

It has been 8 years since we had a puppy and I had forgotten some things.

  1. Puppies have sharp teeth which they use to chew on anything available – including noses. Beekeeper Brian has dubbed her “Baby Shark.”
  2. They are small and can fit through small spaces – like the bars of the baby gate – so they must be watched carefully. Fortunately, she will grow and be more containable.
  3. Puppies, like babies, get up at night – sometimes a lot. I’ve decided it is ok. I have to get up to use the bathroom frequently at night so we have a “potty party.”  To clarify – I use the inside facilities and take Honor outside.
  4. It is incredibly fun to watch them run and play. Honor wrestles with Mini, our other rescue. They play and play until Honor is worn out. Then they recharge.

Max, who is the only male and 8 years old, is taking this all in stride. He has always been a calm dog and is very patient with the new additions.

It is good to have a full house again!

30 06, 2023

More Chicks

By |2023-06-20T12:47:37-05:00June 30th, 2023|Uncategorized|1 Comment

A Blog by Chicken Wrangler Sara

Rachel helped a third-grade class at her school hatch chicks this spring. She procured the eggs, monitored the process, and found homes for the chicks once they hatched.

One of those homes was Miller Farm. They lived in the brooder for a while.

Eventually, they outgrew the brooder and were ready to join the rest of the flock. I neglected to check the fence for escape hatches and the chick managed to wander into the neighbor’s yard.

I fixed that gap and they found another one and began to explore our backyard.

I  think I have secured the chicken yard.

The good news is it looks like most of the chicks are hens. We can always use more chicken eggs!

23 06, 2023

Reptile Whisperer

By |2023-06-20T12:31:19-05:00June 23rd, 2023|Uncategorized|0 Comments

A Blog by Chicken Wrangler Sara


My husband and I recently attended a wedding at an old water well station. It was a beautiful venue and the bride was a former piano student so it was a lovely event.

As we walked in, there was a small snake on the path. I guess he wanted to see the ceremony. Several of the guests protested so Beekeeper Brian picked him up and put him in the grass.

A couple of weeks later, we went to my parent’s house to celebrate Daddy’s birthday. There was a tree frog on their fence that somehow ended up on Brian’s shoulder.

As long as none of the reptiles come to live on Miller Farm, I am fine. We’ve already had snakes, lizards, and a bearded dragon. We’ve moved on to feathered creatures and, of course, dachshunds.

6 02, 2023

The Full Moon and Me

By |2023-01-23T07:59:22-06:00February 6th, 2023|Uncategorized|1 Comment

Source: NASA

Moonbeams lit up our little corner of the world Sunday night. The sky was dark, but the light made shadows as Finnegan MacCool and I walked.

I guess that’s why the Native Americans named it The Snow Moon. We had no snow to sparkle here on the Texas Gulf Coast, but I remember how the ground glistened when there was.

Read more about Native American full moon names here. It’s fascinating.

Every time there’s a full moon I think of a rhyme my Irish grandmother taught me as a wee little girl, I See the Moon.

I see the moon, the moon sees me,
God bless the moon and God bless me:
There’s grace in the cottage and grace in the hall;
And the grace of God is over us all. 

She also told me the man in the moon would hear me. I remember that too. I wasn’t lonely. Not with my Finn along, but I thought of Carl Sandburg’s words.

Edie Melson, judythe morgan

The next full moon – called the Worm Moon or Lenten Moon – will be at its peak on Tuesday, March 7, 2023, at 7:40 a.m. ET.

Don’t miss the opportunity to go out and chat with the man in the moon.

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